Mini Art Challenge — 4

More mini art made on index cards that I have completed this summer for ICAD 2013. Again, if you missed the explanation of this challenge, you can read about it HERE.

Yes, I AM a voracious reader, although prepping for a big family gathering we hosted on July 4th cut into my reading time this past week. Here are more books, more reading, and more art cards:

12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A semi-dysfunctional family circumnavigates the globe by Mark Jakobson

12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A semi-dysfunctional family circumnavigates the globe by Mark Jakobson

I made this card by quickly scribbling watercolor crayons in the appropriate areas, dabbing on a sloppy water wash, and drawing in details with a scrapbook marker once the card had dried. I like the impreciseness of the sketch. (Confession: this is a book I did not finish because, although I usually enjoy travel writing and family-adventure writing, I got bored part way through this book.)

MOVING DAY! (No reading other than texts and GPS...)

MOVING DAY! (No reading other than texts and GPS…)

I saw someone else do paper weaving on one of their index cards. I decided to try it, using strips cut from a state map. I like the random pattern but wish I had done all of the horizontal pieces on the orange/yellow city-map side to make more contrast and make the weaving more clearly visible. I did a quick sketch with scrapbook marker of the U-Haul Truck traveling on a highway toward home, carrying the belongings we gathered from storage with friends.

based on reading a website and blog by Julie Fast (http://bipolarhappens.com) and on skimming one of her books

based on reading a website and blog by Julie Fast (http://bipolarhappens.com) and on skimming one of her books

I was attempting to show the moods of a bipolar child on this card. The top represents celebrations, wild joy, and living large. The bottom represents sliding down into dark, depressed emotions. In between, there are red slashes to show the rages during phase changes. Once I get to the office supply store, I will attach the “teeter-totter” with a paper-brad fastener. This piece graphically shows the swings toward different emotional states. It also has the BP child in the center, with family members jerked this way and that through the mood storms…

The Bipolar Child by Demitri Papolos & Janice Papolos

The Bipolar Child by Demitri Papolos & Janice Papolos

This is a very impressionistic rendering of the photo on the front of this classic book. It was done with watercolor crayons, using a mix of strong, dark strokes and gentle rubbed patterns.

Blog/Website/FB catch-up day!

Blog/Website/FB catch-up day!

Some days I read very little print material, but seem to spend all of my free time catching up with reading blogs, websites, emails, and facebook posts. This card is an attempt to illustrate ways I was artistic as a child. It is my response to an excellent blog post from http://www.faithbarista.com. (You can read it HERE.) The thought bubbles are memories of music, dress-ups, writing stories and poems, and playing make believe (such as jumping over the picnic table benches turned on their sides while pretending to be a show-horse!) This card is simple in both design and in using my usual supplies, but brings back happy memories and reminds me that I have been creative and artistic for many decades!!

this i know: notes on unraveling the heart by Susannah Conway

this i know: notes on unraveling the heart by Susannah Conway

I struggled for quite awhile, trying to figure out how to illustrate this book about a grieving widow who is putting her life back together one walk on the beach, and one polaroid photograph at a time. I saw someone else do a “knitted” zentangle pattern on a card and decided to try making my own in a heart shape, leaving the edge unraveled. I found a basic pattern by doing an internet search. You can see an example HERE. Mistakes are entirely my own–and the unintentional “dropped stitches” are entirely too much like what happens when I try to knit!

LOOK-ALIKES Around the World: An Album of Amazing Postcards by Joan Steiner

LOOK-ALIKES Around the World: An Album of Amazing Postcards by Joan Steiner

The Look-Alike books are absolutely amazing picture books (written for children, but every artist should take time to study the detailed scenes in these books). One of my daughters brought home a bag of finely shredded US dollar bills which became the starting point for this card. The money confetti on the upper left is supposed to be grass growing in the rocks. The bits of feather are supposed to be plants overhanging the edge. and the bit of paper towel overlaid on colored, crinkled foil is supposed to represent Niagara Falls. Unfortunately, this looks absolutely NOTHING like I envisioned it…sigh… Although if I step back and take a few deep breaths, it is a fascinating, textured, abstract-art card. Maybe I should just describe it that way and then I would be an amazing artist! HA!

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5 thoughts on “Mini Art Challenge — 4

  1. I so enjoyed reading about the thoughts and processes behind your work. I don’t know how you manage to do all you do my friend! I was especially in love with your doodled knitting…what a great idea to illustrate ‘healing’…loved it!

    • Thanks Molly! The reading is not a challenge—to me it is like breathing, I can’t survive if I’m not reading. Doing art regularly, on the other hand, is a challenge! That’s one reason I’m loving the index cards—such a small “canvas” is definitely less intimidating.

  2. I love the variety in your cards and the explanation behind the images about Bipolar Disorder. I work with kids with mental health needs and they can sometimes only really express themselves through art. It’s such a powerful medium.

    • Thanks for your encouragement! Usually I find joy–big and small–in every day life. But on difficult days (especially the frustrations of dealing with my preteen “baby” who has bp) art certainly helps ME keep my sanity!!

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