Mini Art Challenge–5

More mini art made on index cards that I have completed this summer for ICAD 2013. Again, if you missed the explanation of this challenge, you can read about it HERE.

This was a busy week+ so my volume of reading was down. That means I have included a number of graphic novels and other less robust “reads” for this group of index card art.

Bonus Card--Reflecting on 2nd in Sermon Series "Magnificent" by Pastor Tom Pauquette

Bonus Card–Reflecting on 2nd in Sermon Series “Magnificent” by Pastor Tom Pauquette

Since I had included a few bonus cards reflecting on Sunday Sermons, I decided to go back and make cards for the first few weeks to complete the bonus series. This one was reflecting that just as the BIOS is the fundamental identity and basis for a computer to function, we have a BIOG (Built in the Image of God) basis for living. This card was freeform sketched with ball point pens, loosely (VERY loosely) based on some on-line photos of computer microprocessors.

"The Song of the Quarkbeast" by Jasper Fforde (advanced reading copy)

“The Song of the Quarkbeast” by Jasper Fforde (advanced reading copy)

This card was a challenge to make since I couldn’t clearly “see” what I was trying to show. The “quarkbeast” in the book is described but never illustrated. I lightly drew the moving ribbons first, then sketched a queer-beast dancing in each ribbon. Then I colored in the ribbons with watercolor crayons. The beasts were given details with ball-point pen. I added the attributes of quarks and some musical notes to finish the representation of the book title. (Yes, having a daughter attend a librarian conference is a wondrous thing–she brought home an extra bag filled to overflowing with books, including advanced copies that will not hit the shelves til later in the fall!)

"The Carpet People" by Terry Pratchett (advanced reading copy)

“The Carpet People” by Terry Pratchett (advanced reading copy)

Another advanced reading copy of a new/old book from a favorite author. (It is a re-write of something first published when he was 17 years old!) This “map” was drawn with scrapbook markers on a separate card, colored in with watercolor crayons, and glued onto the original index card to make it 3 dimensional.

"It's a Feudal, Feudal World: A Different Medieval History" by Stephen Shapiro

“It’s a Feudal, Feudal World: A Different Medieval History” by Stephen Shapiro

This was a fun, non-traditional juvenile book about the middle ages. I was fascinated by the use of graphs and charts blended into the illustrations. I tried a few sketched in ball-point pen: the Woman’s Work pie-chart skirt was loosely copied from the book. The bar-graph book table was my own attempt at “infographics.”

a pile of old, rediscovered letters written between two grown brothers in the 1940s...

a pile of old, rediscovered letters written between two grown brothers in the 1940s…

I decided this stack of letters counted as daily reading—both because they take forever to decipher and read and because I really wanted to collage bits and pieces! I thought about using a color copier to get the faded ivory tones of the papers, but decided to go for starker black and white (with gray tones) instead. I copied a variety of letters and envelopes, then tore out interesting bits and collaged everything using mod-podge. I added a stamp from one of the envelopes for authenticity and a pop of color.

Another bonus card--reflecting on Sermon #4 in a series by Pastor Tom Pauquette

Another bonus card–reflecting on Sermon #4 in a series by Pastor Tom Pauquette

This card was quickly sketched & filled in with water color crayons. I added the words with a scrapbook marker, then did a water-wash with a small brush. I like the stark roughness of the sketch…

"Immortal Wife" by Irving Stone

“Immortal Wife” by Irving Stone

I was excited to find this book about Jessie Benton Fremont and explorer husband John Fremont. I first read it 20+ years ago. I am not completely happy with the finished look of this card…but I AM happy that I was trying new things. I attempted to show America in an abstract way, with arrows showing the back and forth movement of people during the 1800s. Copying some of the 3D cards posted on the ICAD fb group, I cut out the St. Louis arch, so it can stand up and make a 3D card. That part was fun…

"French Milk" by Lucy Knisley (a graphic novel)

“French Milk” by Lucy Knisley (a graphic novel)

I enjoyed this graphic novel because of the drawings of places I enjoyed visiting with my own daughter. However, it was a somewhat boring read… I quickly sketched this card from a photo in the book, in somewhat the same style as the author/illustrator. (I used my trusty black scrapbook marker.)

"Blue" by Pat Grant (another graphic novel)

“Blue” by Pat Grant (another graphic novel)

The story in this for-adults graphic novel was surreal, but I absolutely LOVED the artwork! I tried to copy some of the Dr. Seuss-ish scenery and added letters mimicing the title page of the book. I used my usual list of art supplies to do this…

"Jana Bibi's Excellent Fortunes" by Betsy Woodman

“Jana Bibi’s Excellent Fortunes” by Betsy Woodman

This was a fun, quirky novel about a woman and her parrot living in a small, hill-country village in India. I have always wanted to try drawing a henna-style pattern. This took forever but was as enjoyable as I thought it might be. (I think I like it even better than zentangles.) In the photo, the pattern is still quite clear with the water-color crayon wash behind it. In person it is much less clear which is sad…

I’m proud of myself for continuing to work on these mini-art cards. Usually I get behind and quit long before this! Maybe I am keeping up because it is tied to making a record of what I’m reading (which I’ve wanted to do for a long time but never gotten around to). Or perhaps it is because 3×5 index cards are so small they are not intimidating and they will “obviously” be quick to complete. (HA! Definitely takes forever on some of the detailed cards…but I guess it is all about perception.)

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