Recipe for Scrapbooking: Memories from the Appalachian Trail

I love making one-of-a-kind art filled with bright colors and whimsical designs. For ages, I ignored using a “recipe” for scrapbooking. Obviously that would lead to monotonous, repetitive pages, right? WRONG! I am intrigued by the results of using this technique. Using the same diagram for a number of spreads makes the process more efficient and speedy. At the same time, by using different patterns and colors and by varying the orientation of the pages, each spread looks unique. (Find lots of “recipes, including the one I used, HERE.) creativescrapbookingmag_2016-summer-sketch_WEB

I recently used this method to quickly summarize a backpacking adventure that my daughter and I had last fall. Take a look! Although they follow one recipe, these pages are distinctly different from each other in appearance and feel. (If you want to read the journaling and hear the backstory to these pages, check out this post on my adventure blog HERE.)

These first two spreads highlight the beauty found along the Appalachian Trail. The color palettes for each were chosen based on the dominant colors in the photos. The first spread has a cool, peaceful feel while the second spread is more vibrant.

“Walk in Beauty: for the one who has eyes to see…LET her SEE!Walk in Beauty_Appalachain Trail

“all of nature is AFLAME: Be fearless in the pursuit of what Sets Your Soul on FireNature Aflame_Appalachian Trail

Both of these spreads about places to sleep on a backpacking trip are turned vertically in a variation on the original recipe. Again, the color palettes and patterned papers were chosen to reflect the emotion of the photos.

“SHELTER: [shel’ter] something below, behind, or within which a person is protected from adverse conditions Shelter_Appalachian Trail

“Happy Campers on the Appalachian Trail: “inTENTS” adventure in the WOODSTent Camping_Appalachian Trail

The next pair of spreads celebrates the partnership on our hiking adventure between my daughter and me. Both closely follow the “recipe” yet they still feel very different from each other. In the first spread, I chose a solid color for the base to balance the whimsical cutouts and the strongly patterned stripes. At first I wasn’t going to use the foggy photos seen in the second spread. However, using colors, patterns, and accent pieces to highlight a “dreamy” theme made the photos feel appropriate for scrapbooking.

“Hiking Partners: my mini meHiking Partners_Appalachian Trail

dreaming of the Trail: Nothing stops the Dreamers: fairytale funDreamers_Appalachian Trail

The final two spreads focus on my experience and my daughter’s experience of this adventure. Both closely follow the recipe, but, again, have very different “feels.” The first spread has coordinating colors with wild patterns. I wasn’t sure at first if the patterns would be too busy, but they seem to blend into the mottled woods in the background of the photos. The solid strips give the viewer’s eyes a place to rest and accentuate the title and journaling. In the second spread, the matching colors help the patterns to blend into a visually smooth background. The feeling of movement on this spread comes from the photos themselves.

“it’s time for ME! the middle passage: …if you can’t leave ‘em behind…Bring ‘em with YOU!ME time_middle age_Appalachian Trail

“nature girl—wild child—forest fairy: andowenNature Girl_Appalachian Trail

Next time you have a series to complete (whether photos, subjects, or themes), consider using a recipe to streamline the process while still creating unique art!

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